Author Topic: How early is too early for private lessons?  (Read 182 times)

Skateordie

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How early is too early for private lessons?
« on: May 13, 2020, 04:20:51 PM »
I'm an adult beginner, and before lockdown I was just starting out with LTS. I'd got up to about level 2 in big group lessons and was faffing about outside them doing things like nearly breaking my wrist while getting a waltz jump. But I felt like I could have been progressing a lot faster if I'd been doing it by myself or in a small group.

I've done other sports and things like learning instruments before, and I tend to get bored in group settings and go charging ahead and developing bad technique because I don't know the structure and skip important steps. I feel like I'd really benifit from private lessons, but at this level could I even find them?  I know it'd likely be quite pricey (20+ a lesson), but skating tends to eat money anyway so I'm prepared for that ;D

I was in the process of making more time for skating (going multiple days a week  instead of one 3-6h session) and the idea of perhaps a lesson every week or two and practice in between seems like it'd be just perfect for me. Could I even find a coach at this point (that is, after rinks are open again)?


transmissionoftheflame

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Re: How early is too early for private lessons?
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2020, 05:27:53 PM »
Well I think generally little and often (or lots and often if you can) is better than a mega session less frequently.  Whatever practice you do you should try and make it good practice so I think getting some 1-1 lessons is a good idea, in combination with group lessons.  Most coaches are quite happy to teach relative beginners 1-1.  I think around 20-25 per half hour is average.  Maybe choose a coach whose way of working suits you based on what you experience in the group lessons, maybe try to watch other group lessons too, to get an idea of the different teaching styles.  It's good to want to forge ahead, but getting excellent basics will mean you progress much faster later on, so do put as much of your enthusiasm as you can into getting those basics really strong.  I've been skating more than ten years and am still improving my basic edges, posture.  Enjoy and good luck.

Skateordie

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Re: How early is too early for private lessons?
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2020, 06:22:17 PM »
Thank you! group lessons were quite informal as I was taking them (big mixed-age group, lots of kids, ect) so getting the basics was easy but getting them like, GOOD wasn't so much. More bredth than depth. I'm not great with self-direction, so it didn't work very well for me. The adults-only group seemed a bit more focused so I'll probably switch when I get back. Skating is the only place where I actually prefer to be micromanaged.

I'm a bit confused about putting 1-1 and group lessons together is like... wouldn't you be doing things at different rates if you're getting different amounts of attention in both settings? Surely it takes longer to get even basic progress in a group of twenty-odd than 1-1? How do you make sure it lines up if you do both?

transmissionoftheflame

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Re: How early is too early for private lessons?
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2020, 08:15:28 PM »
Big groups are probably not great, smaller groups can work well if the teacher is good at it and gets round everyone to give them corrections.  The advantages of groups are: camaraderie, cheaper, you get time to practice without some staring at you.  1-1 you get closer attention and your coach will have more time to be really picky.   In a 1-1 lesson your coach can tailor it to your specific needs.  I tend to think what counts most is the effort you put in and the quality of the teacher, but I think if you can afford 1-1 and find it suits then as long as your coach is good then you will have advantage over those doing solely group.  You can have different teachers for both, and I think this is fine as long as they are both good as they will both be teaching you the right way, but may spot different things and have different emphases.  IMO rinks won't open any time soon (months) so get some skates with wheels (either figure skates with wheels or a decent paid of inlines with a rockered wheel setup) and find a car park or somewhere similar to skate in the open air.

WednesdayMarch

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Re: How early is too early for private lessons?
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2020, 09:34:45 PM »
Some people start with one to one lessons from literally the first step.  It sounds like you would benefit from the more intensive teaching.  Try to pick a coach who enjoys teaching adult beginners if you can.  Personally, I have always loved teaching adults and adult beginners are great because I know I can start them off with good technique rather than having to unpick habits later.  Some coaches find teaching adults difficult, although that's usually the younger ones as they find the dynamic harder to negotiate.  Also try to pick one who takes teaching adults seriously and doesn't skimp on the technique.  Because good technique is everything in skating.

Most of all, enjoy the journey!
Returned to the ice in Sept 2017 after a major leg injury in 1999. Skating in Graf Dance boots and MK Phantom Para blades. It's still a bit slippery.

Loops

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Re: How early is too early for private lessons?
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2020, 08:33:40 AM »
Some people start with one to one lessons from literally the first step.  It sounds like you would benefit from the more intensive teaching.  Try to pick a coach who enjoys teaching adult beginners if you can.  Personally, I have always loved teaching adults and adult beginners are great because I know I can start them off with good technique rather than having to unpick habits later.  Some coaches find teaching adults difficult, although that's usually the younger ones as they find the dynamic harder to negotiate.  Also try to pick one who takes teaching adults seriously and doesn't skimp on the technique.  Because good technique is everything in skating.

Most of all, enjoy the journey!

It's never too early to start privates. And this ^is really important.

Finding a coach who actually respects adults is HUGE. (I don't have access to one right now, and it's taken a toll on my skating, and quite frankly my enjoyment of the sport)

When things start up again, keep your eyes open at your rink(s)- see who the other adults use, and who seems to have a coaching style you'll likely mesh with. Also talk to the other adults.  It's a great way to make friends, too!

FootsieDAX

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Re: How early is too early for private lessons?
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2020, 10:26:02 PM »
I'm a bit confused about putting 1-1 and group lessons together is like... wouldn't you be doing things at different rates if you're getting different amounts of attention in both settings? Surely it takes longer to get even basic progress in a group of twenty-odd than 1-1? How do you make sure it lines up if you do both?

Hi I did this before lockdown and it worked well, I was making sure I was asking my coach to explain thoroughly the elements we were learning in class, plus she would suggest basic things that needed improving that she noticed I had not gotten right in class (she wasn't the one teaching the class, but I would show her what we did that day). So if you can afford it financially, I would definitely recommend it. I made so much progress when I first started one-on-one coaching. It was quite pricey, but for me it was worth it -- and as you say, we have to be aware that skating is a rather expensive sport. Still, I take comfort from the fact that I don't have a passion for something that's even more expensive -- for instance, car racing!  :o

transmissionoftheflame

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Re: How early is too early for private lessons?
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2020, 11:23:20 AM »
Totally agree with FootsieDAX.  And yes, 1-1 is great where there is something from the group lesson that you're not getting.  As you progress, there may be a club where you are that does something like an edge class and this is another case where you can go to your 1-1 coach afterwards and ask for some further tips on stuff you found hard in the class.