Author Topic: Tell me about "attitudes"  (Read 482 times)

Loops

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Tell me about "attitudes"
« on: March 11, 2020, 05:07:08 AM »
Hi Folks,

It's been a few years since I've posted on here- life got busy, but now I need to ask for your help.

I live in France, and am helping translate the general announcement for the Adult Competitions we hold here.  In English skating vocabulary, does the word "attitude" exist (in a technical sense....don't want to get into people's personalities), and if so, what does it mean for you?

After a few responses, we'll see how it matches up, or not, and if necessary I'll need to solicit your help to find a better word....

Thanks in advance!

skatey

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Re: Tell me about "attitudes"
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2020, 10:23:54 AM »

It's been a while since I posted too!


Is this a spin?  Layback Spin I think is the closest. I can't think of anything else where the leg is bent behind.

black

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Re: Tell me about "attitudes"
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2020, 12:11:20 PM »
https://www.isu.org/figure-skating/rules/fsk-regulations-rules

Page 128;

15. Leg and Foot Positions

a) Coupée – The free foot is held up in contact with the skating leg
from an open hip position so that the free foot is at a right angles
to the leg of the skating foot;

b) Passé – The free foot is brought up to the side of the skating leg
from a closed hip position so that the free foot is parallel to the
leg of the skating foot;

c) Attitude – The free leg is bent, and brought up out and behind at
a ninety degree angle to the leg of the skating foot.

Is this what you are looking for?
Sliding on frozen water is the easy part of ice skating.

Loops

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Re: Tell me about "attitudes"
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2020, 06:06:04 AM »
Thanks for your input everyone, it is exactly as I suspected.  In colloquial French, at least in the world of Ice Dance, an "attitude" is any move done on one foot with the free leg extended, so arabesques, and pretty much any spiral position, with or without a catch-foot, you can think of.

I don't know if the English word "Spiral" covers all that (officially), or if there's another better term.  I bet the ISU has something already though, so I'll be looking into that, thanks Black for the link to the ISU docs.

"Attitudes" are a type of "Pose" another word I was having trouble with, but apparently has an official ISU definition in English, so I will be digging into that, too. But a "Pose" includes all of the above, plus spread eagles, lunges, bauers and hydroblades and probably some other things.

There is added confusion, because this is solo dance, a category that exists in France, and apparently in the UK, too (??) but no where else. The French terminology is regulated by the Ice Dance commission of the FFSG (the French equivalent to NISA), but they don't bother to create English language versions.  Since solo ice-dance is not recognized officially by the ISU, terminology for moves that aren't done in standard (i.e. couples) dance has evolved on its own trajectory.   For example, to me a combination spin (from colloquial US English Freestyle skating) is a spin where you change position, so camel-sit, layback-Bielmann, etc, but in French Solo Ice dance a Combination spin means a change of foot.  I need to see what the official ISU definitions are of that, as well.

If Solo Dance is in fact a category skated here, I would love it if any of you could point me to where NISA puts out its official rules governing solo ice dance.

Fun times ahead for me! 

Giuli.Jules

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Re: Tell me about "attitudes"
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2020, 11:43:33 PM »
I know of an attitude as a positioning with a bent leg at 90 degree.  I am familiar with it as an American skater and also familiar with the term in ballet or other forms of dance.  I would never consider any form of a spiral an attitude, but rather that one particular position.