Author Topic: NISA Coach L1  (Read 383 times)

AnabelleMom

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NISA Coach L1
« on: January 20, 2020, 03:24:41 AM »
Does anyone know what it looks like to get a license for level 1 coach ?

VisuallyImpairedOnIce

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Re: NISA Coach L1
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2020, 05:55:23 AM »
A friend has recently completed this, and I will hopefully start when I'm the right level - there's more info on the website if you look under coaching :)


However, from what I understand you need to be 16, a Level 1 skater with all 3 tests passed, and then you apply to do your Level 1 coaching, this will end with you being qualified as an assistant coach, so able to work alongside a Level 2 coach helping with group lessons only. It involves a lot of volunteer hours, writing up what you're doing, and at the end when you have enough hours etc there's a written and practical exam. My friend did some other stuff too, like first aid and safeguarding courses.
Started lessons again: 6/11/2012
Finished Skate UK: 29/11/2018
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MarkD

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Re: NISA Coach L1
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2020, 05:49:44 PM »
I'm not sure what the lowest NISA/BIS level you need to be is, but there is a big reduction in the number of volunteer hours assisting coaching once level 6 is passed - something like half as many.


You can also start the volunteer stuff before 16 if I recall, but need to be over 16 for the exams.

transmissionoftheflame

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Re: NISA Coach L1
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2020, 09:00:08 PM »
Possibly a controversial or harsh view but I strongly disapprove of the creation of some intermediate coaching qualification that requires less skating expertise.  Knowing what I know now I would not want to be coached as beginner by anyone below a NISA Level 2 coach.  I simply feel unless you've passed the levels you will probably not have the knowledge needed to give accurate corrections to anyone.

WednesdayMarch

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Re: NISA Coach L1
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2020, 11:05:17 PM »
The Level 1 Coaching qualification doesn't really qualify you to do anything.  There are another 2 to go through before you can actually coach properly and get paid for it.  Both a lot more money to do than the Level 1. All the details are on the NISA website.
Returned to the ice in Sept 2017 after a major leg injury in 1999. Skating in Graf Dance boots and MK Phantom Para blades. It's still a bit slippery.

transmissionoftheflame

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Re: NISA Coach L1
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2020, 01:41:21 PM »
The Level 1 Coaching qualification doesn't really qualify you to do anything.  There are another 2 to go through before you can actually coach properly and get paid for it.  Both a lot more money to do than the Level 1. All the details are on the NISA website.


I think you're able to assist as an L1 coach.  I worry that the definition of "assist" at certain rinks may be somewhat elastic and lead to corner-cutting.  Apologies to any rink managers or coaches reading who feel this is a slur on anyone's integrity.


There's now such as thing as a Level 2 Skate UK coach.  Last I read that qualified you to coach solo but only up to Skate UK level.  I think the minimum test pass for that is 3 rather than 6.  For the reasons stated above, I don't feel this is ideal.  I appreciate not every brilliant skater is a good teacher, but I think to be able to be a good teacher you ought to have gone through the process of learning excellent basics and I think Level 6 as a minimum is quite low enough.

WednesdayMarch

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Re: NISA Coach L1
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2020, 01:58:35 PM »
Level 2 Skate UK Coach cert qualifies you to teach group classes of the Skate UK levels.  You can't coach independently and can't get paid.   I need to have a chat with NISA/BIS about my qualifications so I'll ask them to clarify the test pass requirement for each level.

One thing I would say is that higher level test passes are still no guarantee of high quality coaching, especially of basics.  It's the quality of the coaching that the coach themselves has had that makes the difference.  Basics are everything, but many coaches want to get to teaching elements too quickly.  I see this especially with younger coaches.  Teaching is often finding 50 different ways to convey the same information, sometimes more.  Patience and a sound grasp of the mechanics of skating areas vital, as are the communication skills to explain why things happen/work/don't work...
Returned to the ice in Sept 2017 after a major leg injury in 1999. Skating in Graf Dance boots and MK Phantom Para blades. It's still a bit slippery.

transmissionoftheflame

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Re: NISA Coach L1
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2020, 02:10:13 PM »
I and my daughters were lucky enough to have been coached by some great coaches, who had in turn been coached by great coaches.  They'd all done figures, too, which I think helps a lot.


Agree some want to rush too much.

WednesdayMarch

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Re: NISA Coach L1
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2020, 02:31:07 PM »
I and my daughters were lucky enough to have been coached by some great coaches, who had in turn been coached by great coaches.  They'd all done figures, too, which I think helps...

I was quite shocked to find so many skaters who struggle to hold an edge for a complete circle!  We learned it early, as part of the preliminary figures requirement.  It doesn't appear to exist in the Field Moves tests, though, which I think is a mistake.
Returned to the ice in Sept 2017 after a major leg injury in 1999. Skating in Graf Dance boots and MK Phantom Para blades. It's still a bit slippery.

transmissionoftheflame

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Re: NISA Coach L1
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2020, 02:47:24 PM »
I was quite shocked to find so many skaters who struggle to hold an edge for a complete circle!  We learned it early, as part of the preliminary figures requirement.  It doesn't appear to exist in the Field Moves tests, though, which I think is a mistake.


Totally agree and it is shocking.  I had learnt at another rink just doing NISA field moves and the first week doing Annie's Edges at AP figure club was traumatic.  After some forward cross rolls to warm up we did holding the circle on every 3rd or 5th cross roll, same backwards and same with insides forward and backward.  I had passed L1 field moves but realised I couldn't really skate at all and had no idea how to hold an edge.  It took me months to do that, but it has stood me in good stead.  Lots of skaters can bang out a fantastic sit spin (well, better than mine) but fall off the circle after about half way.  I think when you want to do multi-rotation jumps you really need that edge control, and of course in dance...

WednesdayMarch

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Re: NISA Coach L1
« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2020, 03:40:14 PM »

Totally agree and it is shocking.  I had learnt at another rink just doing NISA field moves and the first week doing Annie's Edges at AP figure club was traumatic.  After some forward cross rolls to warm up we did holding the circle on every 3rd or 5th cross roll, same backwards and same with insides forward and backward.  I had passed L1 field moves but realised I couldn't really skate at all and had no idea how to hold an edge.  It took me months to do that, but it has stood me in good stead.  Lots of skaters can bang out a fantastic sit spin (well, better than mine) but fall off the circle after about half way.  I think when you want to do multi-rotation jumps you really need that edge control, and of course in dance...

YES!  Every word of that!

Occasionally I teach an edge class and I am almost dreading the day I introduce them to that cross roll and hold the edge for a full circle exercise!  There may well be mutiny...  :o
Returned to the ice in Sept 2017 after a major leg injury in 1999. Skating in Graf Dance boots and MK Phantom Para blades. It's still a bit slippery.