Author Topic: Another hockey beginner  (Read 3246 times)

AndyinSwindon

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Re: Another hockey beginner
« Reply #88 on: November 22, 2017, 04:50:51 PM »
Hi Leif,

I was reading about your frustrations, and yep, I can relate to how you feel 100%.  I have only been skating overall for 11 months now as you know, and I know I am one of the weaker skaters on the LTP sessions, but my view is that it is supposed to be exactly that...LEARN TO PLAY.  I get sick and tired of the show ponies passing to their mates and talking down to everyone as if they're Sidney S*dd!ng Crosby.  If they're that good, why aren't they playing pro?
I have chatted with a lot of friends at a similar ability to myself, and they all feel the same way.  If a lot of these show ponies were up against a decent team, they'd soon be out to pasture!  I have suggested to those friends that it'd be nice to start up a complete rookie league, for people like ourselves that are learning to play, but aren't getting a look in.  It soon gets tiresome and boring when you don't have a chance.  The biggest problem would seem to be ice time.  It's just so hard to get.
With a rookie league, the guys that play rec would be non-eligible, and it'd give a chance for the rest of us to get our chops up.  One thing I noticed recently on a LTP session was that one of the coaches ran some 'skating skills drills', a few of us, myself included, skated over to him to practice core skills (backwards crossovers, shooting etc), and a few of the others, whilst they could have used the tips, almost seemed loathe to join us, instead going for hockey drills, almost out of embarrassment for being identified as lesser skaters.
Leif - we need to get together for a skate sometime!
Started skating 07.01.17
Currently working through NISA LTS Levels.
Currently wobbling through hockey LTP sessions.

WednesdayMarch

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Re: Another hockey beginner
« Reply #89 on: November 22, 2017, 11:45:28 PM »
One thing I noticed recently on a LTP session was that one of the coaches ran some 'skating skills drills', a few of us, myself included, skated over to him to practice core skills (backwards crossovers, shooting etc), and a few of the others, whilst they could have used the tips, almost seemed loathe to join us, instead going for hockey drills, almost out of embarrassment for being identified as lesser skaters.

Andy, it might not be that long before those show ponies are the lesser skaters.  Back when I was training, the pro-ice hockey team used to take lessons from the ice dancers in order to improve their basic skating.  "Power skating" was what we called it.  ;-)  Basically, forwards and backwards stroking, forward and backwards crossovers and some turns.  The hockey boys saw us training one day and were quite astonished at the way we could move very quickly around the rink with hardly any pushes and they wanted to know how we did it.  Those lessons did them the world of good and they admitted to enjoying them, too.
Returned to skating in Sept 2017 after a major leg injury in 1999. It's still a bit slippery...

Leif

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Re: Another hockey beginner
« Reply #90 on: November 23, 2017, 10:05:11 AM »
Andy: It is at least reassuring to hear that I am not alone in my frustrations. I am lucky as I have found a novice friendly group on Saturday evenings (2 sessions per month), and another one on Monday morning although that needs me to take some leave from work. Have a search round and you might find a more suitable group. I have the advantage that I live not too far from Basingstoke, Bracknell, Guildford and Gosport rinks which gives me more choice. It is annoying that a Skate n Puck session which is supposed to be FOR novices is stuffed to the gills with show ponies. Yes a skate would be good, I am flexible as to time but Swindon is a bit too far for me as I am in the GU34 area.

WednesdayMarch: I am sure you are right. A friend who skated for a real team 30 years ago said he learnt a lot from figure skaters, and his technique is really good, he has the smoothness and agility of a proper skater. I am wondering whether or not to take lessons from coaches at a local rink. I'm not bothered about the cost (20 per half hour), but whether or not I would benefit, and whether they might teach me things unsuitable for hockey. Some do teach hockey players, and they make them do standard drills (edges, hockey stops etc).

The height of your blades shouldnt be a problem
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEPTtsiWAuQ&sns=fb
 ;D

 ;D Wow!

AndyinSwindon

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Re: Another hockey beginner
« Reply #91 on: November 23, 2017, 05:05:32 PM »
Hi Leif,

I'd be more than happy to come down your way for a skate when my working schedule allows, pick your rink and I can be there.  Always nice to try somewhere new.

As for lessons, I'd recommend it.  I often get blag from hockey mates when I practice my 3-turns and 2 foot spins, about the 'airy fairy' stuff.....but they can't do it, and it's fun watching them try.  I had a one on one session with an ex hockey pro a few weeks back, and his take on it was that I may be a weak skater now (but not as weak as I was), but as I am learning correctly, and with proper technique, the day will come when I could potentially outskate the detractors.  As I've mentioned before, it amazes me how many of my hockey friends can barely skate on one leg, let alone backwards on one leg around a circle.
Started skating 07.01.17
Currently working through NISA LTS Levels.
Currently wobbling through hockey LTP sessions.

Leif

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Re: Another hockey beginner
« Reply #92 on: November 24, 2017, 01:02:19 PM »
Hello Andy

I guess it depends when you turn up. During the weekday, outside of holidays, Basingstoke has good ice and not many skaters so it is really good for practicing drills. They usually do a wet squeegee first thing, and the ice is fine all day. Evenings and weekends the ice is usually absolutely atrocious. No squeegee between 10am and 4pm, with figure skaters on between 10 and 11, so you can imagine the state it gets into. I am told that Guildford is busy weekday mornings (lots of kids), less so in the afternoon. The ice is usually good. Bracknell is good weekdays, the ice is usually lovely. If you can give me lots of notice. I have three days hols left this year, which need to be booked over the next week or so.

As you know, I keep moaning that others do not pass to me. Well last night someone made a beautiful pass to me, from the goal area to the middle of the rink. I would have had a nice clear run forwards, maybe a shot, maybe a pass to a team mate who could finish it off. So I excitedly went to move my stick to intercept the pass, and my stick would not move. It was frozen in a horizontal position at waist height, and would not move no matter how hard I pulled. I looked round and discovered that the blade had got stuck between two of the boards that line the rink walls.  :o  ;D I'm told it looked quite amusing!

On a more positive note, several friends without prompting said I was skating much better than in the past. They also said I was holding the stick better (two hands on the shaft, blade near the ice). I was also trying to take in some advice from another lad, who thought I panicked whenever I received the puck. He said to slow down, take your time. He's right of course. I am lucky that I get constructive criticism from several people, and it really really helps.

I am sure you are right about good technique. Fluency and confidence will come with practice, no doubt, and you will be better than those who are more casual in their approach. Whether or not the more, err, senior players, such as thee and me can ever get really good remains to be seen.  :)
« Last Edit: November 24, 2017, 02:55:09 PM by Leif »

AndyinSwindon

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Re: Another hockey beginner
« Reply #93 on: November 26, 2017, 10:55:30 PM »
Well, my Bauer Speedplates arrived last week, so I baked them up on Saturday morning, but didn't quite get them right.  Had a quiet chat with my friendly local ice rink, and got them rebaked - and my skates have never felt so comfortable.  No foot pain, I feel centred above the blades, full foot contact with the foot bed, and no negative space.  So far have done 6 hours on them, and no pain whatsoever (apart from the expected fatigue of wearing skates for 6 hours).

Impressed!
Started skating 07.01.17
Currently working through NISA LTS Levels.
Currently wobbling through hockey LTP sessions.

Leif

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Re: Another hockey beginner
« Reply #94 on: November 28, 2017, 07:35:20 AM »
 O0

As I mentioned before I bought step steel blades. After using them for several sessions I'm convinced they improve my skating. Highly recommended.

Had a session yesterday morning, really good, it was more fun than competition, with lots of passing. One chap was in his sixties, he'd been learning for two years.  :)
« Last Edit: November 28, 2017, 02:37:35 PM by Leif »

Leif

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Re: Another hockey beginner
« Reply #95 on: December 11, 2017, 03:27:38 PM »
I've been getting a bit downcast lately, my skating's okay, but my hockey is pants. Well the others at the Monday morning sessions have been giving me lots of advice, telling me where I am going wrong: Don't pass across the goal, hold the stick with two hands, bend my knees more, don't stand in front of the goal, don't rush to the puck, and so on  ... And it helps a lot.

A lot of hockey is not about the skating, it's about playing in a team, placing oneself in the right place to support the other players, or to receive a pass. I know one lad who is potentially a brilliant hockey player, but he never passes which makes him useless. Time and time again he gives the puck away near to his goal because he thinks he's Sydney Crosby when he could have passed it. I know someone else who is nowhere near as good a skater, but he plays better hockey, because he understands the game better. I heard the others discussing another lad. They said he'd never be picked for the team because he has the wrong attitude even though he has talent!

I've recently had two bad sharpenings from my usual sharpener. They were out by 4/1000". I went to someone else and he did a much deeper hollow than asked, maybe 3/8", which totally messed up my skating. Sigh. But he redid them without charge last Saturday, and today they were excellent. Having good blades, and good ice, made a big difference. The session today was good. I'm no Wayne Gretzky (that reference dates me) but I think I can give myself a little pat on the back. 18 months ago my skating was basic. Six months ago I'd never played hockey. And today I was able to take part in a scrimmage, and prevent some of the better players on the opposite side from coasting. I didn't play well, but I think I contributed rather than being a liability, and I am slowly improving.

One thing I have noticed is the conflict between beginners and experienced players. The beginners need space to develop and guidance. The better players find the beginners annoying. Ah well, I guess that's how it is, you grab the ice time you can, and do your best.

Slowly slowly catchy monkey, as they say.