Author Topic: Skate fitting  (Read 798 times)

Leif

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Skate fitting
« on: January 19, 2017, 06:53:51 PM »
I had some hockey skates fitted and I suspect they are a bit on the big side. My toes are nowhere near the end, the insole is about 15mm longer than my foot, and there is oodles of space either side. I take a size 8.5 to 9 shoe, the skates are Bauer Vapor X500 size 8EE. The heels are held firm which is good.

Would this make any difference to my skating? Or should I have a better fit?

Incidentally, I checked online to see how to fit skates, and the Guildford rink shop seemed to have cut all of the corners, no measuring, no trying several sizes, no checking the feet in the boot.

AndyinSwindon

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Re: Skate fitting
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2017, 09:22:39 AM »
Hi Leif,

I had similar concerns when I read online about skate fitting after buying my skates, but have come to the conclusion that there is no hard and fast rule.

When I recently bought my skates, the guy in the Wildcats shop asked my shoe size, then wet off and bought out some appropriately sized CCM's and Bauers.  I tried the Bauers first but they were like vices on my feet (which I think are a little wider than average, but not by much).  I tried the CCM's (Tacks 4092) and they were much more comfortable, but he didn't do the pencil test, nor do my feet touch the toecap.

I have had a lot of pain over the last couple of weeks with breaking them in, and having talked to some of the more experienced hockey skaters (and a couple of the guys from the rec team), this seems pretty normal.  I have baked them this week, and am hoping to try them out this evening.  I have also ordered some CCM custom insoles and some skate socks.  I have tried thick socks - way too painful, thin socks - too slippy, and an average workboot type sock, which seems to have given the best results.  I have also since done the pencil test myself, and it is fine across the top of the boot.

One tip I was given was also to swap the standard laces for waxed laces.  The first couple of times I skated in the new boots I used the lace tightener, and the pain was unbearable.  I have since learned to ease off on the first few lace rows over the toes and tops of my feet, and then put the tension on from the ankle onwards.  The wax laces help with this as they stop the laces slipping and keep the pressure distributed where I want it.

My shoe size is about UK 8-8.5, and my CCM skate size is 8EE.  The 'rules' dictate I should be about a 6.5-7, but that would be way too tight across my foot.

I have come to the conclusion that despite all the advice I have read boils down to one thing....what fits right for one, may be completely wrong for another.  I think as long as it feels comfortable, doesn't let your ankle flex too much, and your foot isn't rattling around, it should be ok.

I hope this helps :-)  (Another entry from Tolstoy!)
Started skating 07.01.17
Currently working through NISA LTS Levels.
Currently wobbling through hockey LTP sessions.

Leif

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Re: Skate fitting
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2017, 09:25:46 AM »
Thanks Andy, very informative. In my case I had no pain from the boots, quite the opposite. I skated last night and a lot of the unease has gone away after they were properly sharpened i.e. not at the rink. So maybe they are fine.

Leif

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Re: Skate fitting
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2017, 08:21:35 PM »
An update, in case someone else has similar problems. The skates were much too big. I tried on a range of skates yesterday, including these:

Vapor X500 size 7EE: good ankle and toe fit, not enough depth, the tongue was uncomfortable.
Nexus 7000 size 7EE: good depth, good toe fit, not enough ankle lock.
Supreme S160 size 7EE: good depth, good toe fit, good ankle lock.

Each model has a different shape to allow for variation in the skaters foot.

I bought the S160 and did 2 hours skating today. My skating is much improved, I did forward inside/outside edge hockey stops for the first time, and had much better left foot control in general. Only slight discomfort, otherwise very comfortable. Really nice skates.

Conclusion: Getting skates one size too big will serously impact your skating.  :( Oh, and one skate may fit one person but not another even though they have the same shoe size.

I hope to have a word with the useless ape-orth who sold me wrong sized skates. How do you stay in business with poor service? The sad truth is that the shop due to its location has a high profile, so they probably get lots of customers, and most will be too ill-informed to realise that their skates are a poor fit, and will assume they are not natural skaters. This is not good for the sport/hobby.