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I love the one-foot slaloms... One of the only moves where I can just do them with the flow of traffic in the public skate without frightening anyone and I feel like there's just about zero chance of me falling over :'D I'm with Wednesday, you may grow to love them too, with time.
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Power pulls. What fresh nightmare is this?! Doesn't help that we were attempting them backwards. I managed the odd one or two but they're not on my list of favourite moves...

Ah, give it time and practice and they will be.  I think I've always called them 'slaloms' and I will freely admit that my 'bad' leg is finding them challenging, but I used to love them.   They are actually easier backwards...*
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Power pulls. What fresh nightmare is this?! Doesn't help that we were attempting them backwards. I managed the odd one or two but they're not on my list of favourite moves...
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General Ice Skating Chat / Re: basic skating skills
« Last Post by deimante on Yesterday at 09:03:00 PM »
i appreciate all of you taking time to answer in detail! you convinced me to take group lessons so i'll try them out from next week and see how it goes.

i find youtube videos helpful and that's pretty much how i've been learning but i find that sometimes i can't quite understand the move or execute it on ice no matter how hard i try so i think that having a teacher specifically tell me how to do it would be super helpful. i still can't do a t-stop because theoretically i understand how to do it but my feet just won't listen ;D.

i understand that everyone learns differently but long did it take you to clear all skate uk/skate star levels?
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General Ice Skating Chat / Re: What did you achieve this week
« Last Post by The Sacred Voice on Yesterday at 04:26:29 PM »
Oh so I don't have to balance and turn on the very back point of the blade? That sounds more promising. I might just ignore it for a while.

I would prefer to bow to Wednesday's superior teaching on this topic as I've done relatively few of the backwards turns (I can do the two footed one, though I never use it, and aside from that then I've only worked on back outside 3 as part of a prep to help with a separate element rather than because my coach wanted me to learn all the backward 3 turns). However I can't resist having another stab at this soooooo... :D

You do do the backwards turns through the heel of your foot, but the area of blade under the heel is (mercifully) not the furthest point of the back end of the blade.

Wednesday's toe lifting suggestion is a much better way of thinking about it because raising your toes is a kind of physical trick that causes your weight to redistribute towards the heel without you consciously forcing it there (you can try this off ice just standing on the floor to feel your weight move as you do the toe lift). This should get your blade in the right spot for the turn and there's plenty of blade there, you're not on the very back point.

One of my learn to skate coaches used to do this alarming thing where he'd rock his feet back right to the very points of the back of his blades and stand up on those end points, mostly to prove it could be done, but he made it painfully clear that none of us should try to do the same! ;D
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General Ice Skating Chat / Re: basic skating skills
« Last Post by The Sacred Voice on Yesterday at 03:32:03 PM »
according to the curriculum i can basically do or working on everything up to level 4. my rink offers skate uk lessons but i was thinking i'll take them when i'm more advanced to save money. however, if i do take up group lessons now, would they make me start at level 1 or could i immediately progress to a higher level?

Rinks all handle their group learning sessions differently so it's hard to say what your rink would do in terms of placing/progressing you. At my rink then they essentially run two classes in the same time slot: one that covers the level 1-4 material and another for the 5-8 material. This is mostly done out of practicality more than anything else, paying coaches to do eight different levels of classes would be expensive for the rink and, broadly speaking, the stuff in 1-4 is all around an appropriate level for new skaters that it gives the coach in charge just enough variety of activities that they can dip in wherever they fancy for each lesson, so, at least where I am, you don't necessarily learn the levels in the strictest of orders. The 5-8 group operates almost exactly the same, but they sometimes borrow exercises from the progression beyond level 8 (Skate Star Bronze-Gold levels) in order to keep things spicy in those groups.

If you were at my rink then I suspect that, at your current stage, they'd put you in the 1-4 group and you'd get bumped up as soon as the coach thought you were pretty competent on that stuff. Honestly, I doubt you'd find being made to redo some early stuff to be that big of a pain because you get a whole new perspective on how you can improve what you're already doing. Coaches can refine what you're doing because when you're working with new elements by yourself then it's hard to know what's "correct" when you don't have an expert on hand to point out little corrections and adjustments.

For example, I secretly taught myself the single loop jump in advance of doing it with my coach, so when we got round to it together then I was able to surprise her a bit with what I'd been working on, but after I'd figured out the basics of the jump then I still had no idea what I was meant to do in order to improve it by, say, adding power while maintaining control and consistency. The positioning I'd been using for the takeoff in my secret practising was acceptable, but the long term growth of the skill, particularly if I ever intended to move towards the double loop, required that I have a similar, but fundamentally refined, body position for it that I probably wouldn't have worked out if it hadn't been for her. Maybe I could've gleaned it from watching enough YouTube videos, but there's nothing like a live human that knows what they're on about and catering to your specific level of learning. This analogy can be stretched to basically any element of skating, even the really early stuff. For instance, you'll find that you'll be working and improving on your crossovers for a surprisingly long time to come yet! Every time you think "yeh, I know how to do those" then your coach will show you a way to make them generate more power and then you have to work on controlling that new speed, etc.

All that said, I appreciate your attitude towards the cost element, keeping a lid on the costs in this sport/hobby can be a challenge! My rink charges something like 41 a month for a weekly half hour group lesson and free entry to the public session that that lesson is held on, so it works out at 10.25/week, although the entry to that public session itself would normally be 8.20 for a standard adult, so you're paying just over 2 more than normal entry for the session and you're getting a half hour lesson on top of the session time, which I think is pretty good value.
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General Ice Skating Chat / Re: What did you achieve this week
« Last Post by FamilySkater on Yesterday at 02:52:36 PM »
Try lifting your toes in your boots. Just a small movement inside the boot, rather than attempting to actually lift the front of the blade.  It's just a small transference of weight rather than a big movement.  Also remember to bend your knees before the turn and come up as you make the turn; down up down.

Oh so I don't have to balance and turn on the very back point of the blade? That sounds more promising. I might just ignore it for a while. 
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General Ice Skating Chat / Re: New to Skating
« Last Post by PK on Yesterday at 02:05:58 PM »
Job done. Feet measured at Al's in Blackpool and Jackson's Edea, and Risport tried out. Jackson's just didn't sit well with my feet. Between the Risport RF Light and the Edea Overature it was a close call. Opted for the Edea because the heel felt to be a little better supported than the Risport. Had my Bauer Vapor X400 hockey skates profiled - not giving up on these!
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General Ice Skating Chat / Re: basic skating skills
« Last Post by FamilySkater on Yesterday at 01:53:30 PM »
i can do both forward and backward lemons and working on the two-foot turn. i'll work on the stuff you suggested too!

according to the curriculum i can basically do or working on everything up to level 4. my rink offers skate uk lessons but i was thinking i'll take them when i'm more advanced to save money. however, if i do take up group lessons now, would they make me start at level 1 or could i immediately progress to a higher level?

I'm in a similar position in that I can do everything up to level 5. I ended up going with the group lessons (although Skate Excellence, not Skate UK). I expected to be frustrated 'learning' the very basics when I really want to be taught turns and spins but the lessons are forcing me to practice stuff which I wouldn't have done by myself and surprisingly it isn't always that easy. I've found that my balance, edges and posture have improved so much that when I am doing the harder stuff by myself it is easier. It was also pointed out to me that while I think I can do all of those moves, I can't do them perfectly. I think that focussing on the basics now means that the harder stuff will be easier when I come to it.
 
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General Ice Skating Chat / Re: basic skating skills
« Last Post by deimante on February 23, 2018, 11:41:22 PM »
i can do both forward and backward lemons and working on the two-foot turn. i'll work on the stuff you suggested too!

according to the curriculum i can basically do or working on everything up to level 4. my rink offers skate uk lessons but i was thinking i'll take them when i'm more advanced to save money. however, if i do take up group lessons now, would they make me start at level 1 or could i immediately progress to a higher level?
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